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Has my email address been spoofed?

Marco Ren

If you’ve ever experienced someone complaining about you sending them “nasty” emails that you never sent – you’re not alone. Some of you may even have received an email appearing to be from yourself, claiming that your PC has been hacked and demanding a ransom in the form of bitcoin. In these situations, your email account may have been compromised. However, if you contact your IT support team and they are certain that your email is secure and has not been hacked, there is another possibility – email spoofing.

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Topics: Staff Training, Security Threats

Do external devices have access to your business's internal network?

Alyssa Sisco

Any infected device that is connected to your internal network has the potential to infect all the other devices on that network. Last week, a third-party vendor brought in a device that when connected to CHI Health’s network, introduced malware to their system. The virus spread to different devices at some of their hospitals and clinics and affected browsers attempting to connect with the health system’s network.

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Topics: Security Threats, Network Security

Do you know if your CEO’s email username and password are being sold on the dark web right now?

Alyssa Sisco

Do you know if your CEO’s email username and password are being sold on the dark web right now? How would you? Eventually, you’ll find out when you have to prevent finance from wiring a hacker - posing as your CEO - large sums of money. Or, you may find out after finance has already fallen for a CEO fraud phishing scam and wired a hacker money… But if there is a way for you to know when your CEO’s credentials are being sold in the first place, you can stop the scam before it even starts. Well, thankfully there is a way you can do this. At CoreTech, we offer Dark Web ID Credential Monitoring to detect and notify you of compromised credentials in real time.

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Topics: Security Threats, Data Breach, Network Security

10 tips for tightening the financial controls of your business

Alyssa Sisco

Recently, it has come to light that Save the Children Federation was swindled into wiring $1 million to cybercriminals. The money was allegedly going to buy solar panels for health centers in Pakistan, which is well within the scope of the organization’s standard operations. Unfortunately, the transaction was not uncovered as fraudulent until a month after it occurred, thus they were unable to stop the cybercriminals from making off with the funds.

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Topics: Staff Training, Security Threats, Owners & Managers

The risks of unpatched applications and unsupported equipment

Alyssa Sisco

Everyday more technology processes are automated, saving us from performing tedious tasks over and over. However, the technology that helps us and makes our lives easier is also used by hackers and cybercriminals to take advantage of us. Hackers use automation to build bots that continuously search the internet for unpatched and vulnerable devices to infect. In fact, almost 30% of all internet traffic is made up of bad bots such as hacking tools, impersonators, scrapers and spammers. Once a hacker finds and accesses your vulnerable computer, it only takes about 20 minutes to infect it. As soon as that one device on your network is infected, it doesn't take long before your whole network is breached.

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Topics: Security Threats, Data Breach, Equipment Purchases, Network Security

How to identify Social Engineering

Alyssa Sisco

Social engineering involves the manipulation or deception of people in order to obtain information or access they shouldn't have. Social engineers could be after a password, bank account information, access to your corporation's network or anything else that could benefit them. Their end goal could be to steal money, company secrets, to disrupt your business or to shut it down entirely.

Because social engineering preys on human behavior, it's one of the most dangerous threats to cybersecurity. Can you rely on each staff member at your company to successfully identify and protect against these attacks?

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Topics: Staff Training, Security Threats, Network Security

Voicemail hackers - a phone system security risk

Jason Hahn
Recently, we’ve noticed a large upswing in people hacking into voicemail systems. These hackers build mailboxes that allow the caller to dial international calls through the system. When they call and select the fraudulent mailbox they have built, the voicemail gives the hacker open access to the victim’s outside lines and they can make long distance and international calls at the cost of the victim. This can add up to thousands of dollars before it's even discovered. With so many security issues to worry about already, we don't want you to worry about one more. So let's take a look at what can be done to keep your voicemail system secure.
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Topics: Security Threats, Phone Systems

Receive a free USB device? It may contain malware.

Alyssa Sisco

When an editor for The Economist (Leo Mirani), received a free mini USB-powered fan at the Singapore summit (where President Trump and North Korean leader Kim Jong-un met) he chose to not plug it in. He didn't know who made this fan, where exactly it came from, or if it had anything on it. However, he did know that any USB device presents the possibility of malware. Whether it's a fan, thumb-drive, mouse, keyboard (or anything else that plugs into your phone or laptop) it could pose a threat to your security. And when all the journalists at a high-stakes meeting - between two countries who have been known to partake in cyber-warfare - are given USB devices, it's best to err on the side of caution. 

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Topics: Staff Training, Security Threats

Are you an easy target for phishing scams?

Alyssa Sisco

The sole objective of any phishing email is to trick you into clicking it. If you aren't vigilant, it can be easy to fall for. It doesn't matter who you are, how much money you have, or what company you work for, you can be targeted and it's important to know how to protect yourself.

Since Amazon and Uber are so well-known and widely-used, cybercriminals have often chosen them to impersonate. Their aim? To lull you into a false sense of security at seeing the familiar brand name. With the addition of a subject line that will illicit a response, anyone could find themselves clicking on a link before even taking a second to think.

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Topics: Staff Training, Security Threats, Network Security

The shift from ransomware to cryptomining

Alyssa Sisco

In its earliest days, ransomware wasn’t much of a threat, because it couldn’t actually encrypt data. But that was in the 80's and 90's, those days are long over in the field of technology. Within the past few years, not only has ransomware become a formidable threat but it has also grown exponentially. The world experienced a growth from 3.2 million ransomware attacks in 2014, to 3.8 million in 2015. Then, in 2016, ransomware attacks jumped to a staggering 638 million. Not only did the amount of attacks increase, but the ransoms themselves shot up from an average of $373 per computer in 2014, to $1,077 per computer in 2016. With 241,000 new variants of ransomware created in 2016 (about 660 new variants per day) anti-malware software was struggling to keep up.

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Topics: Security Threats, Trends, Network Security